Tag Archives: herniated discs

Acting as a human guinea pig to experience advanced spinal mobilisation capability of IDD Therapy

IDD Therapy is the fastest growing conservative spinal treatment.  Thoughts about the application of spinal mobilisation got me thinking about how we might make use of the parameters of treatment for different therapeutic objectives.  

In this video I act as a human guinea pig to set a treatment with an increased level of spinal mobilisation and extended duration of distraction.  That sounds more dramatic than it was since treatment is very safe, although I was slightly nervous!

IDD Therapy is a programme of treatment involving a series of one minute distraction and mobilisation cycles to decompress targeted spinal segments.

Part of the mobilisation is a patented oscillation capability at the point when the joint is distracted. Typically, this oscillation force is set at 10lbs and applied for one minute at a moderate frequency.

The computer software in IDD Therapy gives clinicians the unique ability to adjust the oscillation in line with principles of manual therapy, whether Maitland, Harmonics etc.

Oscillation Frequency & Amplitude

Differing frequency and amplitude of oscillation/mobilisation (60 seconds)                                                               Low Freq’cy      Moderate Freq’cy          High freq’cy               10lbs oscillation            20lbs oscillation

In this video, I explore what a higher oscillation force feels like by increasing the oscillation force from 10lbs to 20lbs (amplitude) at the point when the joint is distracted under tension.

Since the oscillation force has a bigger distance to travel between high tension and low tension, it is necessary to decrease the frequency, ie the number of cycles, to allow time for the distraction force to go up and down within the range of the oscillation.

This reduces the number of cycles of oscillation in a 60 second high distraction. Therefore the duration of the oscillation at the high distraction is increased from one minute to 90 seconds.

Thus the joint is opened for longer and at the same time, the joint and surrounding soft tissues are exposed to more significant distraction and mobilisation forces.

I have received many IDD Therapy treatments and observed that the combination of longer distraction at high tension and greater degree of oscillation results in a greater feeling of decompression.

The treatment feels more powerful and remains comfortable. The next day after treatment, I could feel greater range of movement, improved posture and less stiffness in the lower back.

Whilst IDD Therapy is typically given as a course of treatments for chronic disc-related conditions, IDD Therapy is used as a tool when clinicians need something more than hands alone to increase range of motion and soft tissue function in the lumbar spine.

Author: Stephen Small
Director Steadfast Clinics Ltd
www.steadfastclinics.co.uk  www.iddtherapy.co.uk